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The Importance of Civic Education

 
 
 

Each of us should strive to be a citizen that is actively involved in our governance. Civic education is not limited to participation in politics and society, it also encompasses participation in classrooms, neighborhoods, groups and organizations. In civics, students learn to contribute to public processes and discussions of real issues. Students can also learn civic practices such as voting, volunteering, jury service, and joining with others to improve society. Civics enables students not only to study how others participate, but also to practice participating and taking informed action themselves.

Civic education empowers us to be well-informed, active citizens and gives us the opportunity to change the world around us. It is a vital part of any democracy, and equips ordinary people with knowledge about our democracy and our Constitution. For example, voting is a major responsibility every citizen should take advantage of.

The Tennessee Secretary of State has several resources available for folks who are looking to become more engaged as well as resources for those looking to learn more about our government. Click here to learn more about the branches of state and federal governments.

Citizenship

As a citizen, we are required to follow the laws of the federal, state, and local government. If we disagree with a law or think public policy could be improved, it’s a great opportunity to get involved and have a voice in our government.

Across the state thousands are doing their part to become a citizen of the United States and Tennessee. Since 2003, the Tennessee Immigrant and Refugee Rights Coalition has worked to empower immigrants and refugees throughout Tennessee to develop a unified voice, defend their rights and be recognized as positive contributors to the state. For many aspiring citizens, the path to citizenship is long, expensive, and complicated. TIRRC assists eligible individuals to become citizens through application assistance workshops, where folks get one-on-one attention from volunteers and attorneys who help them complete the paperwork.