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Nurturing a Parent-Student-Teacher Connection in a Virtual World

 
 
 

Many students, families and teachers across Tennessee and the globe are working to adapt to a more virtual education platform. Some school districts have remained completely virtual, while others have adapted to a hybrid system or remained open for in person classes. No matter the platform, parent involvement is generally a key indicator of a successful education experience.

This year, however, poses many new challenges for parents and teachers alike. For example, teachers now must work to keep that connection with students in an online world. Meanwhile, parents may now be tasked with overseeing their children’s education. Consider these tips in a virtual school setting;  

Encouragement: Being a positive encourager is possibly the most important role for a parent or guardian in a virtual school setting.  

Praise: Praise their good work just as you would in a traditional school setting. Surround them with examples of all the positive things they’ve accomplished.

Lend a helping hand, but not too much: When assisting your child with schoolwork be encouraging without giving away answers. Coach and work with them but if it becomes too difficult don’t be afraid to reach out to the teacher and request additional help. Don’t forget, try to remain positive and encouraging. 

Educational Resources for Tennessee Parents and Students

Best for All Central is an instructional hub with resources for families that include video lessons, worksheets, and educational standards information. Families can look up any subject and any grade to find resources to assist them at home or in companion with school materials.

Bridging the Distance, Family Remote Learning launched to help parents and families navigate the same remote learning tools their child’s teachers are using. It also contains videos and modules about setting a schedule and creating learning spaces.

The Family Assessment Portal is now active and allows parents to access progress scores using their child's student ID and date of birth.  

Tennessee Comprehensive Assessment Program (TCAP) has been the state's testing prgram since 1988 and includes TNReady assessments in math, English language arts, social studes and science, as well as alternative assessments like MSAA and TCAP-Alt for students with special needs. 

TNReady Parent Resources